2020 Best Invention
Attorney John Coble

Attorney John Coble

Bankruptcy Attorney

John Coble has practiced as both a CPA and an Attorney. John's legal specialties were tax law and bankruptcy law. Before starting his own firm, John worked for law offices, accounting firms, and one of America's largest banks. John handled almost 1,500 bankruptcy cases in the eight years that he ran his own law office. John has spent the last few years developing software and working on select data science projects. John holds a second law degree (LLM in Taxation) from the University of Alabama School of Law and a Data Science Certificate from Microsoft. John has worked on other graduate-level education in the fields of business and economics.


All ArticlesCredit IssuesAfter BankruptcyBankruptcy BasicsBefore FilingCarsChapter 7Consumer RightsCourtDebtsDeciding To FileHousingHow To FileNon BankruptcyProperty ExemptionsStudent LoansTaxesWage Garnishment

Articles written by Attorney John Coble

I Received an Eviction Notice. What Does It Really Mean?

When you receive a residential eviction notice from your landlord, there are different ways you can respond and the strategy you choose may depend on the type of eviction notice you receive. This article covers the different types of notices required for eviction proceedings and what options you have if the landlord fails to send an eviction letter before an eviction.

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Understanding Foreclosure Statutes of Limitations

Statutes of limitation dictate the amount of time that a creditor can initiate a foreclosure case against a borrower in the event of nonpayment. If a case is brought after the statute of limitations has run, the case should be dismissed. Certain actions may "restart the clock" on a statute of limitations period available to creditors interested in foreclosing on a borrower's property.

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Refinancing a Car Loan With Bad Credit

Favorable auto refinancing terms are often extended to borrowers with good credit. Borrowers with bad credit need to "shop around" carefully to secure decent refinancing rates. If decent rates are extended, refinancing an auto loan can save a borrower thousands of dollars. But, borrowers with bad credit need to understand the terms that they are being offered carefully or the potential savings overall could be minimal.

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Do I Still Owe the Bank After a Mortgage Foreclosure?

The proceeds of a foreclosure sale don't always cover the total balance that a homeowner owes their lenders. When this occurs, the remainder owed is referred to as a deficiency balance. State law dictates when and how a lender may hold a borrower responsible for a deficiency balance. Borrowers may proactively work out a repayment arrangement with their lenders, they may seek to have the balance forgiven via bankruptcy, or they may be held responsible for repayment of the balance via a deficiency judgment.

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Rebuilt Title Car Loans Explained

When a car's title is classified as a "salvage" title, this means that the vehicle has either been severely damaged or totaled. If the vehicle is repaired, the salvage title classification may shift to a "rebuilt" title. Buyers should be cautious when purchasing a vehicle with a rebuilt title because the car or truck may cost more to insure and the purchase may be harder to finance. Buying a vehicle with a salvage title is a process additionally burdened by the costs of repairing the damaged car.

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How Long Will a Collection Account Stay on My Credit Report?

Paying off a collection account isn't enough to get it removed from your credit report. The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires creditors and collection agencies to report accurate information to the credit bureaus. This article discusses how long collections accounts can stay on your credit report, whether a collection account hurts your credit score, and what you may be able to do to get the collection account off your credit report.

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Can I Erase Negative Items From My Credit Report?

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) gives you the right to dispute inaccurate negative items on your credit report, but you don't have a right to remove accurate items. Yet, there still may be some things you can do about negative items even when they are accurate. This article will discuss what you can do about negative items on your credit report and how to find and dispute inaccuracies on your credit reports. We’ll also touch on requests to remove items through pay-for-delete negotiations and goodwill letters.

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How to Answer a Summons When You Are Sued

If you have yet to begin filing bankruptcy you may choose to answer the complaint. A summons can certainly lead to more drastic legal actions when not handled properly. You have a certain amount of time to answer the summons and if you fail to answer it could result in a default judgment.  

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What Is Student Loan Forgiveness?

Forgiveness is when you do something - like work in the public service sector for example - that qualifies you to have your loan eliminated. Here's a summary of the different student loan forgiveness programs.

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What Do I Do About My Car Payment That Is Way Too High?

If you're like most people, you had to take out a loan to buy your car. Car loan payments usually rival health insurance, student loans, and housing payments for the highest expenses. This article will cover your options to reduce your car payment with or without bankruptcy.

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Can You Sell a Car That Has a Lien on the Title?

If you want to sell a car that has a lien on the title, you’ll need to take a few extra steps. If you trade your car in with a dealer, they’ll handle the process. If you sell to a private party, you’ll need to handle getting the lien released. You can do this at the lender’s office or hire an escrow company to help. If you have negative equity in the car, you’ll need to be able to pay it off to get the lien released.

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Can I Walk Away From a Mortgage?

If you’re struggling financially and can’t make payments on your mortgage loan, you may be wondering what to do. If you owe more on your house than what it's worth, it could make sense to quit making payments and walk away from your mortgage, but it's good to keep in mind that there are consequences to walking away from a mortgage. There are also other options available to you for making your mortgage payment more manageable. Read on to learn about what you can do if you're upside down on your mortgage loan.

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How Does Payday Loan Consolidation Work?

Payday loans are rarely a good idea. These loans are easy to get since there’s usually not a credit check, but they’re hard to get out of. Few people are able to pay off these loans on the next payday. Usually, it takes several paydays to pay off one of these loans, which can put you into a negative cycle of increasing debt. A payday loan consolidation is one option for payday loan relief. Even if you’re paying 30% interest on the consolidation loan, that’s better than paying 400% on the payday loan. This article will discuss how to use lower-interest personal loans to consolidate payday loans and other debt-relief options if you’re struggling to repay payday loans.

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Can You Sell a Car That Has a Lien on the Title?

If you want to sell a car that has a lien on the title, you’ll need to take a few extra steps. If you trade your car in with a dealer, they’ll handle the process. If you sell to a private party, you’ll need to handle getting the lien released. You can do this at the lender’s office or hire an escrow company to help. If you have negative equity in the car, you’ll need to be able to pay it off to get the lien released.

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What Is a Lien and How Does It Affect My Property?

A lien is a property right held by a creditor to secure the creditor’s right to payment from the borrower. Once the creditor is paid in full, the lien is released and the borrower owns the property free and clear. This article will provide an overview of the different types of liens, how they arise, and provide some guidance and additional resources on how to deal with liens in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

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What Is a Deficiency Judgment?

It's common that a deficiency balance remains after a foreclosure sale is complete. Whether the mortgage company chooses to pursue the deficiency balance depends on the amount of the deficiency and state law.

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How to Lower Your Student Loan Interest Rate

You have many options to lower your interest rates. Refinancing is good when you have good credit. Lowering your interest rate may be as simple as calling your loan servicer and asking for a better rate.

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What Is Robo-Signing and How Does It Affect My Mortgage?

Robo-signing is when documents are signed by someone who doesn't understand them. It was a problem with mortgage documents in the 2008-10 housing crisis. Mortgages were being transferred between many different parties. This made it hard to know who had the legal right to foreclosure. Robo-signing is not illegal, but the practice is no longer common.

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18 Bank Accounts You Can Open Even if You Have Bad Credit

It used to be that if you had bad credit you could only open subpar second-chance checking accounts. They often had high fees and few benefits or good features. Now there are a lot of online banks that offer checking accounts with great features, even if you have bad credit. This article looks at 18 great options.

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Consumer Rights Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)

The FCRA regulates consumer reporting agencies, creditors , and those who request another's credit report. This law protects consumers by restricting information that can be used in credit reports, who can access credit information, and how long entries can remain on individual reports.

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4 Facts About Child Support and Garnishment

If you’ve been ordered to pay child support, you probably have a lot of questions. How did the court determine that you should pay this amount? What happens if you fall behind on payments? Could you go to jail or lose your license for not paying child support? What can you do if you can’t afford to make the payments you’ve been ordered to make? All these questions and more are covered in this article.

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Understanding the Ability-To-Repay Rule

The ability-to-repay (ATR) rule requires mortgage lenders to verify that borrowers will be able to repay their mortgage loans. Lenders must verify this when underwriting a new residential mortgage. This article explains when mortgage lenders are required to use the ATR rules, how the ATR rules are applied, and the legal remedies for violations of the ATR rules.

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Do Mortgage Companies Have To Wait 120 Days To Foreclose?

As a general rule, your mortgage company can't foreclose unless you’re more than 120 days delinquent on payments for your principal residence. This article will cover the 120-day rule, when it doesn't apply, and certain actions the servicer must take during the 120 days. Finally, the article will look at some temporary COVID-related regulations that can extend the no-foreclosure period longer than 120 days.

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The Lender Won’t Show Me the Note. Can It Foreclose Anyway?

Asking the lender to show you the note is a defense you can use to stop or delay mortgage foreclosure. How well this defense works will depend on your state's laws. It often only buys time for you to work on other foreclosure alternatives. This article explains what the show-me-the-note defense is, how it works in different states, and where it’s most likely to work.

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Fighting a Foreclosure

This article will help you understand the possible outcomes of your foreclosure case and help you to outline a plan unique to your circumstances, needs, and goals.

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How Long After Filing Bankruptcy Can I Buy a House?

Many people are concerned that filing bankruptcy will prevent them from buying a house in the future. The truth is, filing bankruptcy doesn’t prevent you from buying a house.

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Reverse Mortgages and Foreclosures: What You Need To Know

In theory, a reverse mortgage should be the perfect solution for aging seniors who have a lot of equity in their homes but not enough in their retirement accounts. The lender loans the borrower money up to the full value of the equity in their home. The borrower then gets to live in the home rent-free until they move out or pass away. Unfortunately, a lot could go wrong. This article discusses the causes of reverse mortgage foreclosures as well as ways to avoid or stop them.

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Debt Relief Programs

There are many potential debt management solutions, including credit counseling, debt management plans, debt consolidations, debt settlements, and bankruptcy. Read more to learn about these various debt management solutions, how to avoid debt relief scams, and how your credit report will be impacted by various debt relief options.

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How To Protect a Non-Borrowing Spouse in a Reverse Mortgage

One of the most common problems with reverse mortgages has been foreclosures on the non-borrowing spouse (NBS) after the borrower leaves the home. This article focuses on how to protect a spouse that’s not on a reverse mortgage.

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Debt Relief for Seniors: Financial Aid Options

Being in debt as a senior citizen is a bigger issue than being in debt at a younger age. Whether you are saving for retirement or have already retired and are trying to make ends meet on a fixed income, time is of the essence when it comes to resolving debt at this age. This article will explore bankruptcy as a potential solution for helping senior citizens eliminate debt, as well as other debt-relief, debt management, and financial assistance options.

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Will the Mortgage Company Garnish My Wages After the Foreclosure?

After a foreclosure, a mortgage company can pursue you for the difference in the proceeds of the sale of your home and the remaining balance. They can use all the collection techniques that other creditors use. They can garnish your wages, levy your bank account, or place a lien on things you own.

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Student Loan Discharge Due to Death

This article will focus on whether your federal student loan or private student loan discharges when you die. It will also answer the question of whether a cosigner or your spouse will be liable for your student loan debt. The tax consequences of a student loan debt discharged upon your death will be considered. Last, this article covers strategies to avoid financial difficulty for your family or cosigners after your death.

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Can I File For Bankruptcy Online?

When you are hit by a sudden financial shock and need a fresh start, you naturally ask - can I file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy online? In this article, we’ll explain the different options for filing for bankruptcy online and the pros and cons of each.

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How Do I File Back Taxes?

There's a way you may be able to make more money while in quarantine. By filing old federal income tax returns, you may be able to claim tax refunds you didn't know that you are entitled to.

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Credit Restoration: What Is It & How Can It Help Me?

Credit restoration is a process you can use to improve your credit rating. You don’t need to hire a special credit restoration company to restore your credit; you can take steps to repair your credit yourself. In this article, we’ll discuss credit restoration, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, and the pros and cons of hiring a for-profit credit repair/restoration company. We’ll also explain how you can repair your credit yourself for free.

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Late Mortgage Payment? Here’s What You Need To Know.

Have you ever wondered what happens when you make a late mortgage payment? With most mortgage companies, a grace period on your mortgage payment will give you breathing room to make the payment after the due date without late fees, penalty payments, or a negative report to the credit bureau. When you make your mortgage payment beyond the grace period, though, you will start to see some consequences. This article will go into detail about what happens when you make a late payment or have a missed payment and how to avoid both.

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I Am Being Sued for a Credit Card Debt. Now What?

A credit card company is suing you for unpaid debts. What do you do? This article explains how to handle a credit card lawsuit, different defenses you can use, and what to do if a judgment is entered against you.

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What’s a Qualified Written Request and How Can It Help Me?

A Qualified Written Request (QWR) is a tool to get information about your mortgage or notify your mortgage servicer of an error. This article will discuss what a QWR is, what it must contain, and what loan servicers are required by law to do when they receive a QWR. We’ll also touch on instances that a servicer doesn't have to comply with your QWR and what you can do if your servicer fails to comply with your QWR.

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How long do negative items stay on my credit report?

Most people don't realize how many time limits there are for negative items on a credit report. There are federal laws regulating credit reports, but there are also agreements among the three major credit bureaus that they'll report certain items for shorter periods of time. This article explains how long different types of derogatory marks can stay on your credit report as well as how to get both accurate and inaccurate items off your credit report.

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How Do I Dispute a Negative Item on My Credit Report?

In this article, we’ll discuss the common errors people find in their credit histories along with step-by-step instructions on how to dispute inaccurate items on your credit reports. We’ll also discuss how much time the credit bureaus have under the FCRA to investigate disputed items and what to do if you don't agree with the investigation results.

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When Will My Unemployment Run Out?

If you're on unemployment, it will eventually run out. Even with the extended benefits available from the COVID-19 relief packages, it's important to be prepared for the day your unemployment ends. For many people, these benefits will probably expire on September 6, 2021. If you might still be jobless at that time, start planning now. There are other assistance options including government programs like SNAP, TANF, and Section 8 housing. Your best choice may be to take advantage of the opportunities available to enhance your career training.

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What Happens In Small Claims Court?

In small claims court, the rules and procedures are relaxed so that non-lawyers can argue their own cases. Court costs, such as filing fees, are lower. As a result, small claims court hearings are much less expensive. This article will explore what kinds of cases you can bring to a small claims court and how this court differs from other courts.

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Mortgage Loan Modification — It’s Possible To Lower Your Monthly Payments

A mortgage loan modification changes the original terms of your home loan to reduce monthly payments, eliminate arrearage, defer payments, and/or reduce the total amount you owe on your mortgage. Often, a modification is the best way to save your home from foreclosure. Read more to learn about the different government programs for loan modifications, the steps to getting a loan modification, and alternatives to loan modifications.

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Can My Bank Account Be Garnished?

If you have outstanding unpaid debt, creditors may be able to garnish your bank account. This is similar to a wage garnishment except it’s on your bank account instead of your paycheck, and some of the rules are different. Learn about what these rules are, what you can do to defend yourself from a bank account levy, and whether a bankruptcy could help end the account garnishments.

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Offer in Compromise vs. Bankruptcy: Which Is Better?

When deciding whether to file bankruptcy or try to do an offer in compromise to deal with your tax debt, there are many variables to consider. You’ll have to consider what you can afford and the probability of a case being accepted and being completed.

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4 Ways To Get "Currently Not Collectible" Status From The IRS

If you're granted IRS currently not collectible status, the IRS will no longer try to collect taxes from you via bank account levies, wage garnishments, or seizures of your other property. If you can't afford to pay anything toward your IRS tax debt, you'll need to request CNC status. Otherwise, you could see your paycheck garnished or have funds in your bank account taken from you due to a bank account levy.

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14 Tips if You Haven’t Filed Taxes in Years

If you haven't been filing your federal income tax returns, it's a good thing you’re here! If you haven't been filing your tax returns for years, you could avoid a lot of trouble with the IRS by filing these old returns. This article will discuss why you should file your unfiled tax returns along with tips for the best way to file these old returns.

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Help! I’m Being Sued For An Old Debt

This article will discuss the ways to handle a debt collection lawsuit. You'll learn how to save time and money when defending against a debt collection matter and may even learn how to win the case.

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What Is an IRS Collection Due Process Hearing?

When the IRS attempts to levy or place a lien on your property, you have the right to a collection due process (CDP) hearing. If you're like most people, you're panicking. Take deep breaths. This article explains the rights you still have and how you can avoid enforcement of the lien or levy.

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How to File a Form 1040-V Payment Voucher

IRS Form 1040-V is a payment voucher that taxpayers often send when submitting payments to the Internal Revenue Service. This form shows the amount they're paying. This article will explore when to use a 1040-V, exactly how to fill out a 1040-V, and alternative payment options that don't require a 1040-V.

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How Much Money Can Be Garnished From My Paycheck?

This article will discuss the basics of wage garnishments, how wage garnishments are calculated, what income is exempt from garnishment, and how to stop a garnishment. Once you understand your options, you’ll be empowered to use whatever options apply best to your situation.

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Filing a Late Tax Return to Claim Your Refund

You can file a late tax return to claim your refund as long as the return is filed no later than 3 years after the due date of the return. If you have withholdings on your paycheck, there's a good chance you have a refund due. Even if nothing was withheld from your paycheck, there's a chance you have a refund due through "refundable tax credits."

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3 Ways a Wage Garnishment Lawyer Can Help You

An experienced wage garnishment lawyer has several tools that may be able to help you with a garnishment order. This article discusses how an attorney can prevent wage garnishments, reduce debts that could lead to wage garnishments, and eliminate existing wage garnishments. Finally, this article examines how a lawyer can help you file bankruptcy.

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Are You Getting Calls From Collection Agencies and Worried What Might Happen? Find Out Here!

Calls from debt collectors are stressful and - if you don’t know what to expect they can be downright scary. Learn whether a collection agency can sue you and how to protect your rights, so you’re ready the next time a collection agency calls.

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Can I Discharge a Private Student Loan in Bankruptcy?

Private student loans are loans extended by private lenders that are not backed by the federal government. This article will cover the limited relief methods available for private student loans. The article will also discuss dischargeability challenges in a bankruptcy filing.

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Perkins Loan Cancellation and Discharge

Federal Perkins Loans are federal subsidized loans that were made to students with exceptional financial need. The federal government allocates the funds for these loans to participating schools. These loans were originated and are serviced by the schools themselves. Though there are many Perkins Loans still outstanding, the U.S. Department of Education stopped allowing new loans under this program after 9/30/2017. The final disbursements allowed were through 6/30/2018.

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Student Loan Forgiveness Programs for Teachers

If you're an educator and you want part or all your federal student loans forgiven, the good news is that you have options. This article primarily focuses on the Teacher Loan Forgiveness Program. Since you do have the option to use other federal programs, it's important to understand how the Public Service Loans Forgiveness Program and the Perkins Loans Cancellation Program can help you. You, the borrower, need to understand these other programs to make a determination of which program is best for you.

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Closed School Discharge

If the school you're attending closes, are you, the borrower, still liable for the student loans you used to attend that school? The short answer is "yes." It's never that simple though. This article will look at the many considerations and actions to take should your school close, whether you will receive the automatic discharge, how the 2020 changes will affect closed school discharges, and the procedure to receive loan forgiveness.

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Student Loans and Borrower Defense to Repayment

If your school engaged in misconduct when attempting to persuade you to attend and/or take out the loan, you could be eligible for student loan forgiveness using the “borrower defense to repayment” program.

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False Certification Discharge

This article will go into more detail about each of these types of false certification loan discharges. A discharge ends your loan like a cancellation or loan forgiveness program. The difference is that student loan forgiveness usually refers to the loan ending due to a period of time served in a teaching or public service job whereas discharge is for some other reason.

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Student Loans and the Unpaid Refund Discharge

When you leave school early, the school should refund your tuition for the portion of the academic period you didn't attend. This is a very important discharge in the time of the coronavirus pandemic when many left school early in the academic period. This refund of loan funds goes to your student loan lender. This will reduce your loan balance and your monthly payments.

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What is an Emergency Bankruptcy Filing?

People seek an emergency bankruptcy filing when creditors are threatening to take immediate action to seize or sell assets. The emergency bankruptcy filing stops the creditor as soon as you file the main bankruptcy forms.

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Am I Responsible for My Spouse’s Debt?

Whether you are liable for your spouse's debts depends on a few different factors. First, you need to know if you live in a common-law state or a community property state. Second, what kind of debt is it? Is it tax debt? Is it a debt secured by your property? Third, if it is a credit card debt, are you a joint owner of the account, or are you only an authorized user? With any debt, you will be liable if you are a joint owner of the account. As a general rule, an authorized user on a credit card will not be liable. All these factors matter.

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Consumer Credit Counseling: What You Should Know

With an array of companies and organizations promising financial independence, it is easy to feel overwhelmed. As many continue to be financially affected in the midst of COVID-19, if you find yourself in unmanageable debt, or you’re just looking to work toward a fresh debt-free start, credit counseling may be a viable path for you.

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Tax Refund Offset and Timing a Bankruptcy Case

There are several different federal, state, and local government agencies that can intercept your federal tax refund if you owe money to these agencies. This procedure is known as a tax offset. This article will look at which agencies can take your refund and how bankruptcy can help you with tax refund offsets.

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What Happens if You Don’t Pay a Collection Agency?

Filing for bankruptcy relief does not mean that you have to give up everything you own. The purpose of filing a bankruptcy case is to get debt relief. The fresh start provided by filing a Chapter 7 bankruptcy would not be a real fresh start if the filer ends up losing all of their belongings. That's where the bankruptcy exemptions come in.

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Why Is LVNV Funding Calling Me?

LVNV is a third party debt buyer. It buys charged-off debts from the original creditors such as credit card companies for pennies on the dollar. Even though these companies only pay pennies for these debts, they are able to collect the full amount of the debt.

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Can a Married Person File Taxes Without Their Spouse?

A married couple filing income tax returns can choose to do so married filing jointly or married filing separately. In the past, the primary reason for filing separate tax returns was to shield one spouse from the tax liability of the other spouse. Couples filing separate returns paid much more in income taxes than couples filing joint returns. Today, with tax law changes, there are situations where filing separately can result in a lower combined tax burden.

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Getting School Transcripts (When You Owe Money to the School)

If you owe the school money or you have defaulted on your student loans, it's common for schools to deny requests for your official academic transcripts. For many, this can be devastating. Without these transcripts, you may not be able to transfer to another school, attend graduate school, obtain a professional license, or qualify for some jobs. Keep reading to find out about your rights and options in this situation.

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What does it mean that a bankruptcy is public record?

Anything that you and I can get access to either through a court or another government entity without first getting authorization to do so is considered “public record.” This article will explore what kinds of records a bankruptcy filing goes into and what it means for you.

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IRS Wage Garnishments

If the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) garnishes your wages for unpaid tax debts, you do have options to stop the IRS. There are a few different tax procedures you can use to stop a garnishment. In some cases, it may even be a good idea to file bankruptcy.

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When to Declare Bankruptcy

You have many options for debt relief. There are debt settlements, debt management plans, debt consolidations, and bankruptcy. Each option has pros and cons. The best choice for you will depend on your particular situation. Whether you should file bankruptcy and what type of bankruptcy to file is unique to your situation. Everyone's financial situation is different.

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Overview of the 7 Most Commonly Used Bankruptcy Exemptions

Bankruptcy exemptions protect a filer’s property to ensure they are able to take full advantage of their fresh start. While the available exemptions vary depending on the state you live in, there are certain types of common bankruptcy exemptions that are generally found in all exemption schemes. This article will provide an overview of the 7 most common types of bankruptcy exemptions and how they protect the filer’s property in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

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Disability and Bankruptcy

How disability affects a bankruptcy case depends on what you mean by "disability." There are three major categories of disability payments: social security disability, veteran's disability, and private disability. Private disability is purchased either by an individual or provided by their employer. Other than to mention that some states’ laws exempt private disability from creditors and the bankruptcy trustee, this article will not cover private disability. This article focuses on government disability in the form of Social Security Disability and Veterans’ Disability.

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How Will Filing Bankruptcy Affect My Children?

If you’re a parent, your children are the most important parts of your life. You don’t want to do anything that could harm their futures. If you’re considering bankruptcy, you may be worried about the impact this will have on your children. The good news is that for those who need to file bankruptcy, the positive impact on your family will far outweigh any inconveniences. This guide examines the issues that could impact your minor children.

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What are the advantages of filing bankruptcy?

Bankruptcy can do wonderful things for you and while many bankruptcies have some risk, others are so simple that you can file without having to pay for an attorney. Continue reading to learn more about the advantages of filing bankruptcy.

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Upsolve is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that started in 2016. Our mission is to help low-income families who cannot afford lawyers file bankruptcy for free, using an online web app. Spun out of Harvard Law School, our team includes lawyers, engineers, and judges. We have world-class funders that include the U.S. government, former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, and leading foundations. It's one of the greatest civil rights injustices of our time that low-income families can’t access their basic rights when they can’t afford to pay for help. Combining direct services and advocacy, we’re fighting this injustice.

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