Attorney John Coble

Attorney John Coble

Bankruptcy Attorney

John Coble has practiced as both a CPA and an Attorney. John's legal specialties were tax law and bankruptcy law. Before starting his own firm, John worked for law offices, accounting firms, and one of America's largest banks. John handled almost 1,500 bankruptcy cases in the eight years that he ran his own law office. John has spent the last few years developing software and working on select data science projects. John holds a second law degree (LLM in Taxation) from the University of Alabama School of Law and a Data Science Certificate from Microsoft. John has worked on other graduate-level education in the fields of business and economics.

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What Do I Do About My Car Payment That Is Way Too High?

If you're like most people, you had to take out a loan to buy your car. Car loan payments usually rival health insurance, student loans, and housing payments for the highest expenses. This article will cover your options to reduce your car payment with or without bankruptcy.

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What Happens if You Don’t Pay a Collection Agency?

Filing for bankruptcy relief does not mean that you have to give up everything you own. The purpose of filing a bankruptcy case is to get debt relief. The fresh start provided by filing a Chapter 7 bankruptcy would not be a real fresh start if the filer ends up losing all of their belongings. That's where the bankruptcy exemptions come in.

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Why Is LVNV Funding Calling Me?

LVNV is a third party debt buyer. It buys charged-off debts from the original creditors such as credit card companies for pennies on the dollar. Even though these companies only pay pennies for these debts, they are able to collect the full amount of the debt.

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Can a Married Person File Taxes Without Their Spouse?

A married couple filing income tax returns can choose to do so married filing jointly or married filing separately. In the past, the primary reason for filing separate tax returns was to shield one spouse from the tax liability of the other spouse. Couples filing separate returns paid much more in income taxes than couples filing joint returns. Today, with tax law changes, there are situations where filing separately can result in a lower combined tax burden.

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Can I File For Bankruptcy Online?

When you are hit by a sudden financial shock and need a fresh start, you naturally ask - can I file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy online? In this article, we’ll explain the different options for filing for bankruptcy online and the pros and cons of each.

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Will the Mortgage Company Garnish My Wages After the Foreclosure?

After a foreclosure, a mortgage company can pursue you for the difference in the proceeds of the sale of your home and the remaining balance. They can use all the collection techniques that other creditors use. They can garnish your wages, levy your bank account, or place a lien on things you own.

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Consumer Credit Counseling: What You Should Know

With an array of companies and organizations promising financial independence, it is easy to feel overwhelmed. As many continue to be financially affected in the midst of COVID-19, if you find yourself in unmanageable debt, or you’re just looking to work toward a fresh debt-free start, credit counseling may be a viable path for you.

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Tax Refund Offset and Timing a Bankruptcy Case

There are several different federal, state, and local government agencies that can intercept your federal tax refund if you owe money to these agencies. This procedure is known as a tax offset. This article will look at which agencies can take your refund and how bankruptcy can help you with tax refund offsets.

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How Long After Filing Bankruptcy Can I Buy a House?

Many people are concerned that filing bankruptcy will prevent them from buying a house in the future. The truth is, filing bankruptcy doesn’t prevent you from buying a house.

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Getting School Transcripts (When You Owe Money to the School)

If you owe the school money or you have defaulted on your student loans, it's common for schools to deny requests for your official academic transcripts. For many, this can be devastating. Without these transcripts, you may not be able to transfer to another school, attend graduate school, obtain a professional license, or qualify for some jobs. Keep reading to find out about your rights and options in this situation.

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What does it mean that a bankruptcy is public record?

Anything that you and I can get access to either through a court or another government entity without first getting authorization to do so is considered “public record.” This article will explore what kinds of records a bankruptcy filing goes into and what it means for you.

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Are You Getting Calls From Collection Agencies and Worried What Might Happen? Find Out Here!

Calls from debt collectors are stressful and - if you don’t know what to expect they can be downright scary. Learn whether a collection agency can sue you and how to protect your rights, so you’re ready the next time a collection agency calls.

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IRS Wage Garnishments

If the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) garnishes your wages for unpaid tax debts, you do have options to stop the IRS. There are a few different tax procedures you can use to stop a garnishment. In some cases, it may even be a good idea to file bankruptcy.

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What Is a Lien and How Does It Affect My Property

A lien is a property right held by a creditor to secure the creditor’s right to payment from the borrower. Once the creditor is paid in full, the lien is released and the borrower owns the property free and clear. This article will provide an overview of the different types of liens, how they arise, and provide some guidance and additional resources on how to deal with liens in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

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When to Declare Bankruptcy

You have many options for debt relief. There are debt settlements, debt management plans, debt consolidations, and bankruptcy. Each option has pros and cons. The best choice for you will depend on your particular situation. Whether you should file bankruptcy and what type of bankruptcy to file is unique to your situation. Everyone's financial situation is different.

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Am I Responsible for My Spouse’s Debt?

Whether you are liable for your spouse's debts depends on a few different factors. First, you need to know if you live in a common-law state or a community property state. Second, what kind of debt is it? Is it tax debt? Is it a debt secured by your property? Third, if it is a credit card debt, are you a joint owner of the account, or are you only an authorized user? With any debt, you will be liable if you are a joint owner of the account. As a general rule, an authorized user on a credit card will not be liable. All these factors matter.

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Overview of the 7 Most Commonly Used Bankruptcy Exemptions

Bankruptcy exemptions protect a filer’s property to ensure they are able to take full advantage of their fresh start. While the available exemptions vary depending on the state you live in, there are certain types of common bankruptcy exemptions that are generally found in all exemption schemes. This article will provide an overview of the 7 most common types of bankruptcy exemptions and how they protect the filer’s property in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

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Disability and Bankruptcy

How disability affects a bankruptcy case depends on what you mean by "disability." There are three major categories of disability payments: social security disability, veteran's disability, and private disability. Private disability is purchased either by an individual or provided by their employer. Other than to mention that some states’ laws exempt private disability from creditors and the bankruptcy trustee, this article will not cover private disability. This article focuses on government disability in the form of Social Security Disability and Veterans’ Disability.

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What is an Emergency Bankruptcy Filing?

People seek an emergency bankruptcy filing when creditors are threatening to take immediate action to seize or sell assets. The emergency bankruptcy filing stops the creditor as soon as you file the main bankruptcy forms.

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How will bankruptcy impact my student financial aid?

Whether you’re still at the beginning of your career and looking to improve your knowledge in your field by going to school or heading back to school to change your career altogether, chances are you’re worried about whether filing for bankruptcy protection will limit your options when it comes to getting student loans. This article will explore the impact of filing bankruptcy on someone’s ability to get a new student loan and provide some additional context about a filer’s ability to discharge student loans in bankruptcy.

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How Will Filing Bankruptcy Affect My Children?

If you’re a parent, your children are the most important parts of your life. You don’t want to do anything that could harm their futures. If you’re considering bankruptcy, you may be worried about the impact this will have on your children. The good news is that for those who need to file bankruptcy, the positive impact on your family will far outweigh any inconveniences. This guide examines the issues that could impact your minor children.

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What are the advantages of filing bankruptcy?

Bankruptcy can do wonderful things for you and while many bankruptcies have some risk, others are so simple that you can file without having to pay for an attorney. Continue reading to learn more about the advantages of filing bankruptcy.

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Upsolve is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that started in 2016. Our mission is to help low-income families who cannot afford lawyers file bankruptcy for free, using an online web app. Spun out of Harvard Law School, our team includes lawyers, engineers, and judges. We have world-class funders that include the U.S. government, former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, and leading foundations. It's one of the greatest civil rights injustices of our time that low-income families can’t access their basic rights when they can’t afford to pay for help. Combining direct services and advocacy, we’re fighting this injustice.

To learn more, read why we started Upsolve in 2016, our reviews from past users, and our press coverage from places like the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.

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