2020 Best Invention

Student Loans

Learn about student loans and how to deal with them. (Hint: you may have options you don’t know about.)

Student loan debt can be eliminated by bankruptcy but it is hard to do. If you need relief from your student loans, learn about all of your options.

This page is your home base for learning about how to deal with student loan debt with and without bankruptcy.

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Getting Financial Aid During and After a Bankruptcy (Guide)

Written by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated October 1, 2021

Filing bankruptcy does not prevent you from getting federal student loans or other types of federal financial aid. While some federal loans do require that you have good credit (which may take a little while to build after filing bankruptcy), others don’t depend on creditworthiness. Instead, they look at your financial need based on your current financial situation. 

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Discharging student loans in bankruptcy: The Brunner Test

Written by Amy CarstLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated March 1, 2021

Under the current Bankruptcy Code, an individual cannot discharge student loans in bankruptcy unless retaining this type of student debt would cause undue hardship. To determine whether such a hardship exists, the bankruptcy courts conduct an analysis known as the Brunner test.

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Filing Bankruptcy to Deal With Your Student Loan Debt? Here are 5 Things You Should Know!

Written by Attorney Kassandra Kuehl
Updated August 10, 2020

Everyone knows that it’s very hard to discharge student loans in bankruptcy. But that is not the same thing as saying that student loans can never be eliminated through a bankruptcy filing. Ultimately, it’s the bankruptcy court judge that makes the decision on whether someone should be able to eliminate their student loans through bankruptcy. Here are the five things you should know if you’re considering bankruptcy to deal with your student loan burden.

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Should I List My Student Loans Even if They Can't Be Erased?

Written by Kristin Turner, Harvard Law Grad
Updated September 15, 2021

Yes. You should include all your debts on your bankruptcy forms, even if some cannot be erased. 

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Timing Considerations If Student Loan Company Takes Your Tax Refund

Written by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated September 3, 2020

There are not many creditors that can withhold, or set off, your tax refund before it ever hits your bank account. The most common instance of this is when the IRS keeps your refund and applies it to a prior year's balance owed. But that's not the only time this can happen. Another reason for the federal government to withhold all or a portion of your tax refund is if you're in default with federal student loans. Since student loans aren't automatically discharged in bankruptcy, this can be a blessing in disguise. However, timing matters, and depending on when your tax refund was taken by the government, you may be better off waiting a bit to file your bankruptcy case.

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Getting School Transcripts (When You Owe Money to the School)

Written by Attorney John Coble
Updated July 22, 2020

If you owe the school money or you have defaulted on your student loans, it's common for schools to deny requests for your official academic transcripts. For many, this can be devastating. Without these transcripts, you may not be able to transfer to another school, attend graduate school, obtain a professional license, or qualify for some jobs. Keep reading to find out about your rights and options in this situation.

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Can You Pay Student Loans with A Credit Card?

Written by Amy CarstLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated March 2, 2021

If you are struggling to make payments, you can use balance transfer checks or an intermediary service to transfer student loan debt to credit cards. An intermediary service, such as Plastiq, makes payments to the loan provider on your behalf. Making student loan payments with a credit card may have some benefits, depending on the card terms. But doing so also carries some serious risks. U.S. Department of the Treasury regulations prohibit lenders of federal student loans from accepting credit card payments. Although there are ways to get around these regulations, the real question you should ask yourself is: *Is it worth it? *

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Can I Discharge a Private Student Loan in Bankruptcy?

Written by Attorney John Coble, Your Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated March 21, 2022

Generally, private student loan borrowers have fewer options for managing their debt than federal loan borrowers. Private student loans that don't meet the definition of "student loan" in the Bankruptcy Code can be discharged. All others must been the undue hardship test.

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What Is Total And Permanent Disability Discharge & How Do I Qualify?

Written by Attorney Natalie Jean-Baptiste
Updated November 4, 2020

Living with a chronic illness or serious injury is hard enough without having to worry about making payments on your student loans. Luckily, the federal government provides the option of canceling a student loan borrower’s federal student loan debt if the borrower is too sick to work. If you become disabled due to illness or injury, you may be eligible for the Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) discharge of your federal student loan debt.

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What Is Student Loan Forgiveness?

Written by Attorney John Coble
Updated November 29, 2021

Forgiveness is when you do something - like work in the public service sector for example - that qualifies you to have your loan eliminated. Here's a summary of the different student loan forgiveness programs.

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Student Loan Discharge Due to Death

Written by Attorney John Coble
Updated December 31, 2021

This article will focus on whether your federal student loan or private student loan discharges when you die. It will also answer the question of whether a cosigner or your spouse will be liable for your student loan debt. The tax consequences of a student loan debt discharged upon your death will be considered. Last, this article covers strategies to avoid financial difficulty for your family or cosigners after your death.

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Student Loan Deferment vs. Forbearance: What’s the Difference?

Written by Attorney Natalie Jean-Baptiste
Updated December 9, 2021

Deferments and forbearances provide temporary relief for student loan borrowers who can’t afford the payments on their federal student loans. When money is tight, you can use deferments and forbearances to temporarily pause your monthly student loan repayment until your financial situation improves. The key difference between a deferment and forbearance is the way the interest is treated.

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Student Loan Forgiveness Programs for Teachers

Written by Attorney John Coble
Updated January 6, 2021

If you're an educator and you want part or all your federal student loans forgiven, the good news is that you have options. This article primarily focuses on the Teacher Loan Forgiveness Program. Since you do have the option to use other federal programs, it's important to understand how the Public Service Loans Forgiveness Program and the Perkins Loans Cancellation Program can help you. You, the borrower, need to understand these other programs to make a determination of which program is best for you.

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Student Loans and the Unpaid Refund Discharge

Written by Attorney John Coble
Updated January 6, 2021

When you leave school early, the school should refund your tuition for the portion of the academic period you didn't attend. This is a very important discharge in the time of the coronavirus pandemic when many left school early in the academic period. This refund of loan funds goes to your student loan lender. This will reduce your loan balance and your monthly payments.

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Perkins Loan Cancellation and Discharge

Written by Attorney John Coble
Updated March 1, 2021

Federal Perkins Loans are federal subsidized loans that were made to students with exceptional financial need. The federal government allocates the funds for these loans to participating schools. These loans were originated and are serviced by the schools themselves. Though there are many Perkins Loans still outstanding, the U.S. Department of Education stopped allowing new loans under this program after 9/30/2017. The final disbursements allowed were through 6/30/2018.

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False Certification Discharge

Written by Attorney John Coble
Updated January 6, 2021

This article will go into more detail about each of these types of false certification loan discharges. A discharge ends your loan like a cancellation or loan forgiveness program. The difference is that student loan forgiveness usually refers to the loan ending due to a period of time served in a teaching or public service job whereas discharge is for some other reason.

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Closed School Discharge

Written by Attorney John Coble
Updated January 6, 2021

If the school you're attending closes, are you, the borrower, still liable for the student loans you used to attend that school? The short answer is "yes." It's never that simple though. This article will look at the many considerations and actions to take should your school close, whether you will receive the automatic discharge, how the 2020 changes will affect closed school discharges, and the procedure to receive loan forgiveness.

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Public Service Loan Forgiveness for Student Loans

Written by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated January 18, 2021

If you’re in public service and work for a government or a qualifying nonprofit, you may be eligible for Public Service Loan Forgiveness of your federal student loans.

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Discharging Student Loans in Bankruptcy: Important Legal Terms

Written by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated March 2, 2021

One of our goals this year is to publish a comprehensive guide on filing an adversary proceeding as part of a bankruptcy to discharge student loans. It will initially be published as a series of Learn Articles. The following is a guide to important legal terms that come up in adversary proceedings.

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Getting Details About Your Federal Student Loans

Written by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated March 4, 2021

Student loan borrowers tend to end up with multiple federal student loans, which can make keeping track of it all quite difficult. The good news is that you can find all of your federal student loans in the National Student Loan Data System.

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Timeline of an Adversary Proceeding (An Overview)

Written by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated January 30, 2021

One of our goals this year is to publish a comprehensive guide on filing an adversary proceeding as part of a bankruptcy to discharge student loans. It will initially be published as a series of Learn Articles. The following is one of the sections in the working draft of the Upsolve's Student Loan Adversary Proceeding ("SLAP") Guide.

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Evidence: What Is It And What Do I Use It For?

Written by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated February 5, 2021

When you bring a court action, you have to support your position by showing evidence. Here's what that means for your student loan dischargeability action.

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Student Loan Default: What Is It? What Can I Do About It?

Written by Attorney Jenni Klock Morel
Updated August 30, 2021

You are not alone if you’re struggling to pay back student loans. Whether your loans are federal student loans or private student loans, there may be options to help you. You’re taking a good step in learning all you can about student loan repayment. A defaulted student loan is a serious matter. Read on to learn about what can happen with a defaulted student loan debt and how to get out of default.

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3 Important Facts About Student Loans & Garnishment

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated November 28, 2021

After 9 months of missed payments, your federal student loan will go into default, making a garnishment likely. For private student loans, default happens much sooner. Keep reading to learn three facts about student loan garnishment that could help you keep your take-home pay and tax refund.

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Can I Pay Off My Student Loans Early?

Written by Attorney Curtis Lee
Updated October 1, 2021

One commonly asked question is if college graduates should pay off their student loans early. The short answer to that question is, “it depends.” This article will examine the various factors to consider before paying off student loans early. And if repaying student loans ahead of schedule is the right thing for you, we’ll also discuss how you can go about doing this.

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What You Need to Know About the Pay As You Earn Student Loan Repayment Plan

Written by Attorney Thomas J. Pearson
Updated April 15, 2021

Want to learn how to make your federal student loan payments more affordable? You might be able to reduce your monthly payment based on your income. Going into an income-driven repayment plan is a big decision and there are many factors to consider. This article will explain one type of income-based repayment plan, help you determine if you’re eligible, and give you some tips for deciding if the plan is right for you.

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Why You Should Change Your Student Loan Repayment Plan

Written by Attorney Tori Bramble
Updated December 31, 2021

After graduation, you're automatically placed on a 10-year standard monthly payment plan. You can choose to remain on this plan but you don't have to. There are a number of federal student loan repayment plans that are more affordable and make you eligible for loan forgiveness down the road.

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Should I Lower My Student Loan Payments With An Extended Repayment Plan?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated October 29, 2021

An extended repayment plan lowers your monthly payment amount by stretching your repayment over 25 years. Rather than consistent payments, on a graduated plan your minimum monthly payments start lower and increase every two years.

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4 Income-Based Repayment Options for Federal Student Loans

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated November 28, 2021

There are four different income-driven repayment plans for student loan borrowers that received federal student aid. The IBR Plan, the REPAYE Plan, the PAYE Plan, and the ICR Plan. They each have different eligibility requirements and potential benefits compared to the standard repayment plan.

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How Much Do I Owe in Student Loans?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated March 31, 2022

If you want to go back to school, finance a house, manage your debt, or file for bankruptcy, you’ll want to find out how much you owe in student loans. It might feel like you need a degree in finance to keep track of your financial aid, but we’re here to help. Keep reading to learn about how you can find out how much you owe on your student loans and how to effectively manage your student debt.

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Can Your Tax Refund Be Garnished if You Default on Student Loans?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated October 1, 2021

Your tax refund can be garnished if you’ve defaulted on a federal student loan. Federal student loans are guaranteed by the government and the government has power over tax refunds. Not all student loans are subject to a tax offset and you can take steps to keep your tax return money. In this article, we’ll tell you about the student loan tax garnishment process and give you some tips on how to keep your tax refund money safe from garnishment.

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How to Lower Your Student Loan Interest Rate

Written by Attorney John Coble
Updated November 26, 2021

You have many options to lower your interest rates. Refinancing is good when you have good credit. Lowering your interest rate may be as simple as calling your loan servicer and asking for a better rate.

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Disputing Student Loans on Your Credit Report (A Guide)

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated September 1, 2021

Housing, employment, and loan decisions are made based on a person’s credit history. If there is a student loan error on your credit report you’ll want to get it fixed. In this article, we’ll give you some guidance on how to fix student loan errors that may appear on your credit report.

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Can I Refinance My Student Loans?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated November 26, 2021

When you refinance your student loans, you take out a new loan and use it to pay off your existing student loans. Refinancing may allow you to benefit from a lower interest rate and/or reduce monthly payments.

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What’s The Best Way To Pay Off Student Loans (Fast)?

Written by Attorney Jenni Klock Morel
Updated November 26, 2021

There’s no penalty for repaying federal or private student loans faster than the repayment schedule. Paying off student loan debts faster will save you money in interest payments. The sooner you’re out of student loan debt, the sooner you’ll be able to achieve other financial goals.

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Why Do I Keep Getting Calls About Student Loans?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated March 8, 2022

This article will explain why you may be getting calls from your student loan lender or loan servicer. If you have unpaid student loans, you may be contacted by a loan servicer for different reasons.

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Student Loan Forgiveness Programs for Nurses

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated November 28, 2021

In this article, you will learn about student loan forgiveness programs available to nurses. Loan forgiveness eligibility qualifies you to have your loan eliminated. Forgiveness programs are only available for federal loans. The following will guide you on how you can reduce or eliminate your student loan debt if you are a nurse.

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Private Student Loans and Wage Garnishment

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated June 5, 2021

Defaulting on the payment of your private student loans can negatively affect your credit score and result in other undesirable consequences. One is wage garnishment. A private student loan lender can even levy or take money from your bank account. Thankfully, there are solutions that can help you avoid these challenges and even provide debt relief.

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Handling Student Loans When You Don’t Have A Job

Written by Attorney Thomas J. Pearson
Updated June 7, 2021

Student loan debt is a serious financial burden for many people. If you’re unemployed, making your student loan payments might be impossible or unreasonably burdensome. This article explains what you can do to avoid harsh consequences for missing student loan payments if you’re unemployed.

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Gifted Money To Pay Student Loan Debt | Will I Have To Pay Gift Tax?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated June 7, 2021

When you’re just starting out, a significant gift from a family member or other loved one can make all the difference. For instance, a gift that pays off all or part of your student loans or, the gift of down payment funds may help you buy a home and begin building equity. If someone has offered a generous gift but you’re worried about gift tax, income tax, and other tax issues, here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know.

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Guide to Consolidating Federal Student Loans

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated November 26, 2021

Consolidating federal student loans streamlines the repayment process and may save you money. Here’s what you need to know to make informed decisions about consolidation.

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Student Loan Forgiveness for Borrowers Who Drop Out

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated November 29, 2021

If you’re struggling to make student loan payments after dropping out of your degree program, it’s important to understand your options. Student loan forgiveness, deferment, forbearance, income-based repayment, and other programs can be confusing. This article offers a basic overview to help you get started.

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Companies That Pay Off Student Loans

Written by Natasha Wiebusch, J.D.
Updated September 20, 2021

National and global companies have recognized the toll that monthly student loan payments take on their employees. Some are willing to offer repayment assistance and tuition reimbursement to help them recruit top talent. Unfortunately, not all of these student loan repayment programs are as helpful as they might initially seem.

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Student Loans And Your Credit Score

Written by Attorney Thomas J. Pearson
Updated July 19, 2021

Like all loans, student loans impact a borrower’s credit history, either positively or negatively. A borrower’s credit history then impacts a borrower’s credit score, as assigned by any of the major credit reporting bureaus. Credit scores affect a borrower’s ability to receive future credit with good interest rates and favorable terms generally. It is very important to have a positive credit score, whenever possible. This article explains how student debt and credit scores affect each other and what related information borrowers should consider when taking out student loans.

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4 Questions & Answers About Student Loans And Income-Driven Repayment Plans

Written by Attorney Jamie Lee Ruiz
Updated October 29, 2021

If you have a high amount of student loan debt, but a relatively low amount of income, you may be wondering if you can arrange an IDR, or income-driven payment plan. This article answers many of the questions you might have, such as what an IDR is, how the monthly payment is calculated, how you qualify for IDR, and what other tools are out there to help with student loan debt.

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Student Loan Forgiveness Options For Healthcare Workers

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated November 28, 2021

If you are a healthcare worker, you may qualify for federal student loan forgiveness. Learn how to find out if you are eligible for these programs, about the different types of debt relief, and other debt relief options that may be available to you.

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Getting Rid of Student Loans: 6 Options To Consider

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated December 9, 2021

If you are trying to manage a student loan debt, you might be disappointed to learn that they aren't often discharged through bankruptcy, but there are other options for student loan management you could be eligible for, including loan forgiveness or cancellation, disability discharge, or forbearance. Read this article to learn which option might be best for you to pursue and other things to consider.

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Income Contingent Repayment for Federal Student Loans

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated November 28, 2021

Federal student loan borrowers have 4 income-driven repayment options. The ICR Plan is one such option if you are struggling with your student loans. . An ICR Plan is for two types of borrowers. In this article, you will learn about the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan.

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How long do I have before my student loan goes into default?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated July 30, 2021

When you miss your student loan payments, you risk defaulting on your loan. Different lenders have different timeframes for when they consider a loan to be “in default,” so it’s important to know the terms of your loan and understand the timeframe for default. This article will explain how long it takes for federal and private student loans to go into default if you miss a monthly payment.

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What Is the Standard Repayment Plan for Student Loans?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated October 18, 2021

Standard repayment plans are available thanks to several different repayment option choices. These plans include extended, graduated, income-contingent, and income-based. All of these options provide borrowers with the ability to lower their monthly payments or extend the term of their loan thereby keeping their payments low.

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What Is Refinancing Student Loans?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 9, 2021

The benefits of student loan refinancing are different for everyone. How much refinancing can help you will depend on your existing loans and your current financial situation. This article covers what student loan refinancing is and how it works. You’ll also learn how to determine whether refinancing is right for you and how to compare lenders to maximize your benefits.

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REPAYE Plan 101

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated November 17, 2021

The Revised Pay As You Earn Repayment Plan (REPAYE Plan) is an income-driven repayment (IDR) plan for federal student loans. Borrowers who aren’t in default and have an eligible federal student loan can make payments under the REPAYE Plan. It requires you to pay 10% of your discretionary income, and the repayment period is 20-25 years.

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Is Student Loan Forgiveness Real?

Written by Attorney Kassandra Kuehl
Updated November 17, 2021

While it may seem too good to be true, you can have your student loans forgiven. That said, you must qualify for a federal student loan forgiveness program and meet the strict requirements. For some borrowers, student loan forgiveness is a good option. Others are better off setting up a manageable repayment plan.

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What’s the Best Student Loan Repayment Plan?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated November 28, 2021

The best federal student loan repayment plan is the plan that works for you. You'll automatically start out in the standard repayment plan, but you'll have the ability to change to a student loan repayment plan that's based on your income.

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How Do Student Loans Work?

Written by Elena Botella
Updated December 31, 2021

Student loans can be offered by the federal government, local governments, or private lenders. They can be used to finance tuition, room and board, and living expenses. The rules and terms for student loans vary and the debt associated with these loans generally cannot be discharged via bankruptcy. Repayment options for federal loans differ from those available for private loans. Similarly, interest rates, grace periods, and prepayment terms differ as well. It is important to understand how the loans you're either being offered or have already taken out "work" when developing a successful plan to repay your student loan debt obligations.

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Average Time To Pay Off Student Loans

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated December 31, 2021

There are two types of student loans — federal student loans and private loans. The time it takes to repay your loans depends on the type of loan as well as the loan repayment plan you have. This article explains the average time it takes to pay off student loans and what options you have to refinance or get a loan deferment or forbearance. We’ll also offer tips for how to pay off your student loans more quickly and get out of debt.

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Income-Driven Student Loan Repayment Plans: How To Get One

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated January 10, 2022

The federal government offers income-driven repayment plans for student loans to help make the payments more affordable. In traditional repayment plans, your monthly payment amount is based on paying the loan in full by a certain date. But in an income-driven plan, your monthly loan payments are based on your income and family size, which helps ensure you can afford your loan payment each month. This article covers how income-driven plans work. It includes an overview of the four different types of income-driven repayment plans, how to choose the right plan for you, and how to apply for the income-driven repayment program.

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8 Strategies To Lower Your Student Loan Payments

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated December 31, 2021

If you’re struggling to pay off student loan debt, you may want to look into lowering your student loan payment. Getting a lower monthly payment can help tremendously, and there are many options to do this. Some strategies for achieving this include signing up for an income-driven, graduated, or extended repayment plan; enrolling in autopay; refinancing your student loans; consolidating your federal student loans; applying for deferment or forbearance; and requesting a temporary payment decrease or deferral if you have a private student loan. The best option for you depends on your financial goals and the type of loans you have. This article will go into detail about each of them.

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What You Can Expect if You Don't Pay Your Student Loan Debt

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated December 31, 2021

Ignoring student loan debt can affect almost every area of your life, including your credit score, your ability to find employment, and your emotional well-being. This article covers the repayment timeline for federal and private student loans and looks at the consequences of paying your loan late or missing payments. We’ll also discuss what options you have if you’re struggling to make your loan payments.

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7 Options if You Can’t Make Your Student Loan Payments

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated December 31, 2021

Student loan default can have serious financial consequences and wreck your finances. If your student loans are coming due and you can’t afford the payments, don’t panic. You can take steps to avoid defaulting on your student loans. We’ll outline some of your options in this article.

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What Happens to Student Loan Debt When a Borrower Dies?

Written by Attorney Tori Bramble
Updated December 22, 2021

It’s important to know how your student loans will be handled if you die. Many factors should be considered, including the type of student loan you have (a federal student loan or private loan), whether anyone has co-signed the loan, and if you live in a community property state. These all factor into a discharge due to death. In this article, we’ll focus on whether federal student loans or private student loans will be discharged upon the death of the borrower. You’ll also get answers about whether a loan co-signer or your spouse will be responsible for your student loan debt after your death.

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The 8 Best Ways To Pay Off Student Loan Debt

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated January 4, 2022

While there’s no one-size-fits-all way to repay student loans. Recent research shows that the best way to pay off your student loans may be by paying down loans quickly at first and then signing up for an income-driven repayment plan if you qualify. But there are several other steps you can take to speed up the process, including making more than the minimum monthly payment, enrolling in autopay, and starting a side hustle. This article covers eight great tips to pay off student loan debt fast.

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Differences Between Subsidized and Unsubsidized Student Loans

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Andrea Wimmer
Updated January 19, 2022

Student loan debt is a major concern among Americans, so student borrowers must make the wisest choice possible when selecting any loan to pay for higher education. As a borrower, the type of loan or loans you get will be a major factor in determining how much debt you must repay after you finish school. Federal student loans are available in two formats — subsidized and unsubsidized. This article discusses some aspects of subsidized and unsubsidized student loans and explains how they differ.

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Upsolve is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that started in 2016. Our mission is to help low-income families who cannot afford lawyers file bankruptcy for free, using an online web app. Spun out of Harvard Law School, our team includes lawyers, engineers, and judges. We have world-class funders that include the U.S. government, former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, and leading foundations. It's one of the greatest civil rights injustices of our time that low-income families can’t access their basic rights when they can’t afford to pay for help. Combining direct services and advocacy, we’re fighting this injustice.

To learn more, read why we started Upsolve in 2016, our reviews from past users, and our press coverage from places like the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.