2020 Best Invention
Attorney Paige Hooper

Attorney Paige Hooper

Bankruptcy Attorney

Paige Hooper is a seasoned consumer bankruptcy attorney with 15 years of experience successfully representing debtors in Chapter 7, Chapter 11 and Chapter 13 cases. Paige began practicing bankruptcy law in 2006 and started her own solo, multi-state bankruptcy practice in 2012. Given her expertise in bankruptcy, Paige was selected in 2011 to create a comprehensive library of practice forms, procedural guides, intake packets, and detailed manuals used to train attorneys and paralegals in bankruptcy law. Paige is committed to using her education and experience to help others and to make a positive difference in the world. She has a Bachelor of Journalism degree from the University of Missouri and a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Mississippi. She is actively licensed to practice law in Mississippi and Tennessee. When she’s not practicing law, Paige enjoys writing, cooking, painting, and spending time with her son, Mickey.


All ArticlesAfter BankruptcyBankruptcy BasicsBefore FilingCarsChapter 7Consumer RightsCourtCredit Card DebtCredit IssuesCreditors MeetingDebtsDeciding To FileDivorceDuring Bankruptcy CaseHousingHow To FileLeasesMeans TestNon BankruptcyProperty ExemptionsStudent LoansTaxes

Articles written by Attorney Paige Hooper

Can Secured Debt Be Discharged in Bankruptcy?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated June 17, 2022

Yes, most secured debt can be discharged in bankruptcy. In Chapter 7 cases, that means your personal liability for the debt is wiped out with the Chapter 7 discharge. But since secured debts are connected to collateral, you don't get to keep the collateral unless you pay the debt. To do so, you may need to reaffirm the debt. In Chapter 13, you repay secured debts through the repayment plan. In both cases, you can surrender the collateral, which means the debt is no longer secured.

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How Does Bankruptcy Affect My Retirement?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated June 17, 2022

Because retirement accounts are protected by exemptions, most people who file bankruptcy keep all their existing retirement savings. Many types of retirement accounts have an unlimited exemption amount, but some — like IRAs — are limited. Social Security benefits are also exempt, but the funds can't be commingled. You must keep them in a separate account.

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Do I Need To Include My Spouse’s Income and Expenses on My Bankruptcy Forms?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated June 17, 2022

If you and your spouse are filing a joint bankruptcy, you have to include their income and expenses on all of the required bankruptcy forms. If you and your spouse live together, but your spouse isn’t filing bankruptcy with you, you still need to include their income and expenses on Schedules I and J and your Statement of Current Monthly Income.

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What Happens to Your Tax Refund in Bankruptcy

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated June 10, 2022

Refunds for taxes you paid on income you earned before you filed your bankruptcy case, will be part of your bankruptcy estate. If you receive your refund and spend it on necessary expenses before you file bankruptcy, it doesn’t become a part of your bankruptcy estate. But if you hold on to the money, the trustee may be able to access the funds if they aren't protected by an exemption. In Chapter 7, refunds for taxes you paid after you filed bankruptcy aren’t part of your estate. But in Chapter 13, your estate includes all the tax refunds you receive during your 3-5 year payment plan. You can avoid turning future refunds over to your trustee by adjusting your tax withholding so you don’t overpay your income taxes.

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What Is a Debt Management Plan?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated May 17, 2022

A debt management plan allows you to combine your debts and make one monthly payment with a lower interest rate. It's set up by a credit counselor and usually takes 3-5 years to complete. Only certain kinds of debt, such as credit card debt, can be included in a DMP. If you have a lot of debt that's secured by collateral (like a house or car loan), a DMP may not be the best option. But you can look into other debt relief options including filing Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

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What Does a Bankruptcy Discharge Do?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated May 17, 2022

A bankruptcy discharge is a court order that wipes out certain debts like credit card debts and medical bills. Once you receive a discharge, you're no longer legally obligated to repay the debts that were discharged. Some debts, like those that are secured by collateral, can only be discharged if you give up the collateral. In Chapter 7 cases, dischargeable debts will be eliminated in a matter of months. In Chapter 13 cases, the filers must complete their 3-5 year payment plan before their dischargeable debts are eliminated.

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What To Do if the Trustee Says You Owe Money to the Estate

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated May 13, 2022

If you own property that's not protected, or not fully protected, by exemptions, you may owe money to your bankruptcy estate. You can either pay the money into the estate and keep the property or asset, or you can surrender the property, keep the exempted amount, and not have to pay into the estate.

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What Is Debt Settlement?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated May 13, 2022

Debt settlement is a type of debt relief. If a creditor agrees to a debt settlement, you make a lump-sum payment for less than the total debt you owe and they forgive the rest. This can work well if you have a large sum of cash at hand. But many who've fallen behind on paying their debts don’t. If you try to save up money to settle a debt, you'll hurt your credit in the meantime if you stop making your debt payments.

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What You Need To Know About Divorce and Bankruptcy

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated May 11, 2022

If you and your spouse get along, you can file Chapter 7 together before you get divorced. Doing so means you'll benefit from larger exemptions and you can wipe out marital debt to ease the divorce process. If you don't get along well, you may want to get divorced first and file your case individually later. Once you file your bankruptcy case, the automatic stay goes into effect, which will delay your divorce proceeding.

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What Is Debt Consolidation?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated May 11, 2022

Debt consolidation is when you combine multiple debts into one. The goal of consolidating your debt is to reduce your monthly payment and get a lower interest rate. It also simplifies your debt repayment, so you're less likely to miss payments each month. Debt consolidation loans and credit card balance transfers are two common types of debt consolidation.

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How To Get a Reaffirmation Agreement in Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated May 11, 2022

To keep your car during and after a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you sometimes need to sign a reaffirmation agreement with the lender and have it approved by the bankruptcy court. This agreement is a contract that confirms you're committed to continue paying your car loan after bankruptcy. It comes with a risk: If you fall behind on your car payments after your bankruptcy, your car may be repossessed and you may be left to pay a deficiency balance.

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What Is Equity?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated May 4, 2022

Your equity in a house or car (the dollar value that belongs to you, not the lender) is the current value of the property minus the amount you still owe on it. When you file bankruptcy, exemptions protect the equity you have in certain assets.

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What To Expect at Your 341 Meeting of Creditors

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated May 4, 2022

In your 341 meeting of creditors, the trustee in your case will verify your identity and the information in your bankruptcy petition. Creditors can also show up to ask questions, but this is rare. In this article and video, we’ll walk you through a typical 341 meeting of creditors in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

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How Can I Get Free Legal Aid?

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated April 29, 2022

Legal advice can be very helpful as you navigate the bankruptcy process, but not everyone can afford to hire an attorney to help them. That's where legal aid comes in. Legal aid organizations offer free or low-cost legal help to eligible individuals. This article will describe what legal aid is, how to find out if you qualify, and what it's like to work with a legal aid organization.

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New York State Garnishment Laws

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated April 13, 2022

Most creditors must get a court order to garnish your wages if you live in New York. Two exceptions are garnishments for public debts, like past-due taxes, and family debts, like child support. The law limits how much of your weekly earnings a creditor can take through wage garnishment. These limits vary based on the minimum wage where you live. Finally, an employer can’t fire you because you have a wage garnishment order against you.

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Can Filing Bankruptcy Help With a Repossession?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated April 6, 2022

So long as your car hasn’t already been auctioned or sold, filing bankruptcy can help stop repossession. If you file Chapter 7, the automatic stay gives you time to negotiate new, more affordable loan terms with your car lender. It can also get rid of a deficiency judgment if your car is repossessed and sold. Filling Chapter 13 can help you reorganize your auto loan debt to get a more affordable monthly payment and spread out past-due payments over several years.

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Should I Tell Creditors I’m Going To File Bankruptcy?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated April 6, 2022

Some people believe telling their creditors they plan to file bankruptcy will stop collection efforts or help them settle their debt. This often isn’t the case though. Telling your creditors about a pending bankruptcy filing can have negative consequences like repossession or ramped-up collection efforts. Read this article to learn more about the pros and cons of telling your creditors that you plan to file bankruptcy.

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How Does Bankruptcy Affect a Car Lease?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated April 6, 2022

A car lease isn’t the same as a car loan. A lease is a contract to use a car for a period of time. It’s not considered a debt when you file bankruptcy. If you have a car lease and file Chapter 7, you can continue with the lease if your payments are current. Otherwise, you can give the car back and walk away from the lease. If you file Chapter 13, you’ll have more options for keeping the car, which we’ll explore in this article.

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What Steps to Take if a Debt Collector Sues You

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 30, 2022

If you haven’t paid a debt, you can be sued by a debt collector. If the debt collector wins the lawsuit and gets a judgment against you, they can take more aggressive collection actions. To avoid this, you’ll need to answer the complaint, prepare a defense, and show up to the hearing prepared. It’s also good to get familiar with debt collection laws, so you’ll know if the debt collector has broken them.

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What Happens if I Transfer Property Before Filing Bankruptcy?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 21, 2022

Transferring property includes selling it or giving it away. If you file bankruptcy, you have to report any property transfers in the two years before you filed on your bankruptcy forms. If the bankruptcy trustee finds that you fraudulent transferred any property, they can undo the transfer to get the property back and sell it to pay your creditors. Read on to learn more about property transfers and how to deal with them when filing bankruptcy.

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Can I Leave Debts Out of My Bankruptcy?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 10, 2022

You need to list all your assets and debts when you file your bankruptcy. Leaving debts out of your bankruptcy filing will mess up your income and expense calculations. It can also be grounds for criminal charges for bankruptcy fraud.

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How to File Bankruptcy After a Divorce

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 10, 2022

If you’re filing bankruptcy after a divorce, your divorce can impact your assets, debts, income, and expenses. You’ll need to understand which parts of your divorce decree affect your bankruptcy and how to include that information correctly in your bankruptcy forms. You’ll need to send your divorce decree to your bankruptcy trustee. This article covers how to file bankruptcy after divorce more in depth.

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Am I Responsible for My Spouse’s Debt?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 10, 2022

Whether or not you’re responsible for your spouse’s debt depends on what state you live in. If you live in a non-community property state, you’re only responsible for debt in your name and debt you’ve co-signed on. If you live in one of nine community property states (or Puerto Rico), you are responsible for your spouse's debt regardless of whose name is on it. There are some exceptions though, which we’ll explain in this article.

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What is an Emergency Bankruptcy Filing?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 10, 2022

An emergency bankruptcy filing is when you file only the minimum required forms to get a bankruptcy case going. It helps you file your case quickly. Emergency filings are helpful if you need to stop serious collection measures like repossession, foreclosure, or wage garnishment. Once you file an emergency bankruptcy case, you need to complete the remaining paperwork within 14 days or you risk having your case dismissed.

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Chapter 13 and Divorce

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 10, 2022

People who have secured debts like a mortgage or car loan can file Chapter 13 to catch up on past payments and keep their property. If you’re getting divorced and you plan to file Chapter 13, you’ll want to consider the timing of your bankruptcy filing. Many people find that it's best to file Chapter 13 after their divorce is final. This article explains the pros and cons of filing before, during, or after a divorce.

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What Happens if I Transfer Property Before Filing Bankruptcy?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 7, 2022

Transferring property includes selling it or giving it away. If you file bankruptcy, you have to report any property transfers in the two years before you filed on your bankruptcy forms. If the bankruptcy trustee finds that you fraudulent transferred any property, they can undo the transfer to get the property back and sell it to pay your creditors. Read on to learn more about property transfers and how to deal with them when filing bankruptcy.

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Disability and Bankruptcy

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 7, 2022

If you receive disability benefits, they could affect your bankruptcy in two ways. First, they can impact your monthly income calculation on some of your bankruptcy paperwork. Second, if you have disability benefits in a bank account when you file, you may need to use exemptions to protect and keep these funds. This article covers when and how to report disability benefits as income, and how to deal with any lump-sum disability payments you have on hand when you file a bankruptcy case.

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Is Life Insurance Protected in Bankruptcy?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 7, 2022

If you own a life insurance policy that has a cash value or if you’re the beneficiary under a life insurance policy and the policyholder dies, it can affect your bankruptcy filing. You may be able to claim a policy with cash value as exempt, but this depends on your state’s exemption laws. If you receive money from life insurance policy after someone dies and you recently filed or will soon file bankruptcy, you need to report the proceeds to your bankruptcy trustee.

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Secured Credit Cards and Bankruptcy

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 7, 2022

A secured credit card is backed by a cash deposit that serves as collateral. If you file bankruptcy, you won’t be able to keep regular, unsecured credit cards, but you may be able to keep a secured card. That’s because secured and unsecured debt is treated differently in bankruptcy. Secured cards are also a great way to rebuild your credit after a bankruptcy filing.

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Should I Keep Paying My Credit Cards if I’m Going To File Bankruptcy?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated February 7, 2022

It’s important to understand that you don’t have to be late on credit card payments to file bankruptcy. But at the same time, if you're facing a hardship and are struggling to make ends meet each month, it's absolutely ok to fall behind on payments before filing bankruptcy.

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Income-Driven Student Loan Repayment Plans: How To Get One

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated January 10, 2022

The federal government offers income-driven repayment plans for student loans to help make the payments more affordable. In traditional repayment plans, your monthly payment amount is based on paying the loan in full by a certain date. But in an income-driven plan, your monthly loan payments are based on your income and family size, which helps ensure you can afford your loan payment each month. This article covers how income-driven plans work. It includes an overview of the four different types of income-driven repayment plans, how to choose the right plan for you, and how to apply for the income-driven repayment program.

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Home Foreclosure: How Long Does It Take?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated December 1, 2021

Foreclosure is the legal process mortgage lenders use to take ownership of a house if the borrower doesn’t make the mortgage payments. How long foreclosure takes depends on many factors, but mostly on your state’s laws. This article describes the basic steps in the foreclosure process and a general timeframe for each step. It also highlights some of the vast differences in foreclosure timelines from state to state and explains some of the factors that lead to those differences.

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If Trump Companies Can File for Bankruptcy, Why Can’t I?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 30, 2021

Bankruptcy isn’t something to be ashamed of. It helps businesses and people — including the former leader of the free world — escape from debt and move forward. Former President Donald Trump has repeatedly used bankruptcy to help his businesses and himself get ahead. This article discusses Donald Trump’s bankruptcies and how they benefited his companies. It also addresses how personal bankruptcy compares to business bankruptcy and why both are necessary for a healthy economy.

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Can I Remove Late Payments From My Credit?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 29, 2021

Late payments on your credit report can cause a dramatic drop in your credit score. This can in turn substantially increase how much you’ll pay for financing. If you find falsely reported late payments on your credit report, you have a right to dispute the incorrect information. In some cases, even if the reported information isn’t blatantly inaccurate, you may still be able to negotiate with the creditor to remove the late payment from your credit history. This article will cover how late payments affect your credit report, the difference between when they're reported correctly and incorrectly on your credit report, and what you can do to remove them.

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What Are Guaranteed Auto Loans and How Do They Work?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 29, 2021

Guaranteed auto financing allows people to buy cars even if they don’t qualify for traditional car loans. Dealerships will look at your current income and employment to determine whether you qualify. You may need to meet minimum income requirements and offer a down payment. These auto loans typically have high interest rates and fees. Shop around and read the fine print carefully to be sure you get the best terms.

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What Are Mortgage Lenders and Mortgage Servicers?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 29, 2021

Whether you’re thinking about buying a home, refinancing an existing mortgage, or planning your next big investment, it’s important to understand how lenders and servicers fit into the mortgage process. This article will explain the differences between mortgage lenders and servicers so you can better prepare for your homebuying journey.

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How Loss Mitigation Can Help You

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 25, 2021

If you’re behind on your mortgage payments and are in danger of losing your home, know that foreclosure is not inevitable. In many cases, mortgage companies work with struggling borrowers to find foreclosure alternatives through a process called loss mitigation. Some mortgage companies even have dedicated in-house loss mitigation programs. This article will discuss four common kinds of loss mitigation solutions and how they work.

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What Is a Foreclosure Mediation Program and How Does It Work?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 22, 2021

Even if your lender begins foreclosure proceedings you may still be able to get your mortgage back on track with a foreclosure mediation program. These programs use neutral third parties to help lenders and homeowners resolve mortgage issues without foreclosure. Mediation programs are great resources, but they aren’t available everywhere.

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The Basics of Chapter 9 Bankruptcy

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 22, 2021

Chapter 9 bankruptcy offers relief for struggling municipalities by shielding them from their creditors and allowing them to reorganizing their debts. Municipalities are granted broad authority to reorganize these debts, especially those related to pensions and labor unions. Chapter 9 filings are rare but often have lasting effects on communities and states.

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I Can’t Afford an Attorney. Can a Pro Bono Lawyer Help Me?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 19, 2021

Nonprofit legal agencies and some attorneys offer free or low-fee assistance under certain circumstances. Other attorneys offer guidance on a contingency basis. Free bankruptcy help can be found via the no-cost filing tool provided by Upsolve.

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Chapter 12 Bankruptcy: An Overview

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 12, 2021

Filing for Chapter 12 bankruptcy helps family farmers and family fishermen relieve their debt burdens, reorganize their finances, continue operating their businesses, and keep the equipment they need to do their jobs.

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What Are Mini Miranda Rights?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 11, 2021

When a debt collector contacts you, they have to identify themselves as a collector and tell you they're trying to collect on a debt. This is sometimes called a "Mini Miranda” requirement. This requirement was created to prevent unfair questioning and practices in the debt collection process. These rights are updated occasionally to address new communication technologies.

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Know Your Rights in the Foreclosure Process

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 11, 2021

The foreclosure process can be long and complicated. There are different processes for different types of loans, but here’s a general look at what will happen if you default on your mortgage and your lender decides to foreclose.

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What Is Refinancing Student Loans?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 9, 2021

The benefits of student loan refinancing are different for everyone. How much refinancing can help you will depend on your existing loans and your current financial situation. This article covers what student loan refinancing is and how it works. You’ll also learn how to determine whether refinancing is right for you and how to compare lenders to maximize your benefits.

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Mortgage Rights After The Death Of A Spouse

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 6, 2021

When your spouse dies, mortgage debt doesn’t just disappear. Learn what you can expect regarding your home and mortgage after your spouse has passed away, and find answers to many common questions, such as who inherits the house, what happens to the mortgage, what rights and protections you have, and what a reverse mortgage is and how it works.

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Strict Foreclosure in Connecticut: How the Process Works

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 2, 2021

Under Connecticut law, there are two types of foreclosures: strict foreclosure and foreclosure by sale. Both types are judicial proceedings that begin with your mortgage servicer filing a lawsuit against you and proving to the court that your loan is in default. Your lender can request either type of foreclosure.

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17 Tips To Defend Your Small Claims Case

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 2, 2021

What should you do if you get sued in small claims court? While the answer depends on the type of case, the worst thing you can do in any case is nothing. A judgment, or court order, against you opens the door for the plaintiff (the person or company who is suing you) to garnish your wages, seize your property, or take other actions against you. Though rules and procedures vary from state to state, these are some important tips for defending any small claims case.

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The Differences Between Judicial and Nonjudicial Foreclosures

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated October 31, 2021

A judicial sale is the result of a lawsuit and a court order, while a nonjudicial sale takes place completely outside of a courtroom. While both procedures end in the same result, they aren’t identical. This article covers how each of these kinds of foreclosure works, the differences between the two, and how to defend yourself against each type.

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How Debt Relief Works

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated October 8, 2021

If you're struggling to keep up with the minimum payments or paying everything you can and not making a dent in the balances that you owe, there are several debt relief options available to help you eliminate your debt and move forward with your life. Read this article to learn the different types of debt relief available and how they work, the benefits and risks associated with each option, and which debt relief solution(s), if any, may be a good fit for your situation.

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How to File Form 433-A

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated October 1, 2021

This six-page form provides the IRS with detailed information about your financial situation. This information helps the IRS verify whether you’re eligible for the relief you’re requesting and determine what you can afford to pay. This article will walk you through how to complete the most recent version of the form.

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How the Right of Redemption Can Help You

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated September 16, 2021

If you’re facing a foreclosure action on your home, you may be able to use your right of redemption to keep your house. In most cases, you have the right to stop the sale by paying off your mortgage debt before the sale takes place. In some states, even after the sale, you have the right to buy the house back within a set amount of time.

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Help Yourself: Self-Reporting to the Credit Bureaus

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated September 3, 2021

In many cases, self-reporting your account information and payment activity to the major credit bureaus is a smart way to bulk up your credit report and improve your credit score. Self-reporting payments, such as rent and utilities, benefits your credit by adding on-time payments that wouldn’t ordinarily appear on your credit report. In this article, you’ll learn what self-reporting is, how it works, what you can report, and how to decide whether self-reporting is a good option for you.

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How Long Does It Take To Build Credit With a Secured Credit Card?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated September 3, 2021

Secured credit cards are an option for people who typically don’t qualify for traditional credit cards. A secured credit account allows you to establish a history of on-time payments so you can build or improve your credit report and increase your credit score. This article covers what makes a secured credit card different from an ordinary credit card, how to use a secured card to establish or build credit, and how to decide if opening a secured credit card account is a good option for you.

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Credit Hacks To Get Better Credit Scores: A Guide

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated September 3, 2021

There is no magical trick to transform your credit overnight. Earning a great credit score takes time, patience, and discipline, but there are several hacks you can use to make reaching your credit goals a little faster and easier. This article covers some of the helpful tips and expert tactics that can boost your credit score.

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The Best Credit Moves if You Have a 500 Credit Score

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated August 23, 2021

If your score is 500, you may not be able to get credit, or you may face extremely high interest rates and fees. Fortunately, the sooner you start taking steps to actively raise your score, the sooner your credit rating will improve. This article covers the factors that lead to a 500 credit score, how that score can affect your ability to get financing, and some steps you can take now to start increasing your score.

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Should I Get A Medical Credit Card?

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated July 26, 2021

A medical credit card is similar to a regular credit card, but they can only be used for certain covered medical expenses and are only accepted by certain healthcare providers. In many cases, there are better options available to pay for medical expenses. This article will explain the benefits and drawbacks of using a medical credit card, help you decide whether this type of card is a good choice for you, and explore other medical financing alternatives you may want to consider.

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Judgment Debtor Exam — When A Judgment Creditor Asks You Questions

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated July 22, 2021

When a person or company wins a lawsuit against you, the court enters an order called a judgment. The judgment states the amount of money you owe the other party, including interest and costs. A judgment debtor examination, or debtor's exam, is a chance for the creditor to gather the necessary information to pursue one or more collection methods. This article discusses what information is covered in a judgment debtor exam, how the creditor can use that information to collect the debt from you, and what rights and protections you have.

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Ways That Student Loans Can Affect Your Mortgage

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated July 19, 2021

Homeownership is a major life goal for many people. In recent years, though, economic challenges have prevented many people from pursuing this goal. Student loan debt is often cited as a reason why so many people are waiting longer than ever to buy a home.

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How Partial Payment Installment Agreements Work

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated June 28, 2021

Owing a lot of income tax debt often feels inescapable, and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) can seem intimidating. Fortunately, the IRS has many options available to taxpayers who can’t pay all their taxes right away and will usually work with you to find a solution. This article takes a closer look at how the partial payment option works, how it compares to other solutions, and whether it may be a good choice for your situation.

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Florida Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Income Limits

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated April 6, 2022

If your household income is less than Florida’s median income for your household size, you’ll qualify to file Chapter 7. If it’s higher, you’ll need to take the full means test and show that your expenses are high enough that you can’t afford to pay the debts you’re trying to eliminate.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Wyoming

Written by Kelly PickeringLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 23, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in New Mexico

Written by Kelly PickeringLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 23, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Utah

Written by Kelly PickeringLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 23, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Tennessee

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 23, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How to File Bankruptcy for Free in Colorado

Written by Kelly PickeringLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 23, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Florida

Written by Rebecca Godbold ShiverLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 23, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Iowa

Written by Attorney Todd CarneyLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 23, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Nebraska

Written by Attorney Todd CarneyLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 22, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Louisiana

Written by Rebecca Godbold ShiverLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 22, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Virginia

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 22, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How to File Bankruptcy for Free in Georgia

Written by Krishna PatelLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 22, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Vermont

Written by Kelly PickeringLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 22, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in South Carolina

Written by Rebecca Godbold ShiverLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 22, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in West Virginia

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 22, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Idaho

Written by the Upsolve TeamLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 22, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Kentucky

Written by Rebecca Godbold ShiverLegally reviewed by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated March 21, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How to File Bankruptcy for Free in Texas

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated February 10, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Connecticut

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated February 10, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How to File Bankruptcy for Free in Nevada

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated February 10, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Mississippi

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated February 10, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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How To File Bankruptcy for Free in Maryland

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated February 10, 2022

Filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be scary and confusing. We provide helpful tips and resources to help you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy in your state without a lawyer.

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Repossession Laws in California

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated January 4, 2022

Repossession is the process of taking back a car after the owner defaults on their auto loan. Each state has different laws and regulations that dictate every step of the repossession process from start to finish. This page will provide an overview of California's Repossession Laws and what you should know if you've fallen behind on car payments.

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Repossession Laws in Delaware

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated January 4, 2022

Repossession is the process of taking back a car after the owner defaults on their auto loan. Each state has different laws and regulations that dictate every step of the repossession process from start to finish. This page will provide an overview of Delaware's Repossession Laws and what you should know if you've fallen behind on car payments.

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Repossession Laws in Colorado

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated January 4, 2022

Repossession is the process of taking back a car after the owner defaults on their auto loan. Each state has different laws and regulations that dictate every step of the repossession process from start to finish. This page will provide an overview of Colorado's Repossession Laws and what you should know if you've fallen behind on car payments.

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Repossession Laws in Arkansas

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated January 4, 2022

Repossession is the process of taking back a car after the owner defaults on their auto loan. Each state has different laws and regulations that dictate every step of the repossession process from start to finish. This page will provide an overview of Arkansas's Repossession Laws and what you should know if you've fallen behind on car payments.

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Repossession Laws in Connecticut

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated January 4, 2022

Repossession is the process of taking back a car after the owner defaults on their auto loan. Each state has different laws and regulations that dictate every step of the repossession process from start to finish. This page will provide an overview of Connecticut's Repossession Laws and what you should know if you've fallen behind on car payments.

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Wage Garnishment in Nebraska

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated December 31, 2021

A wage garnishment order allows creditors to take money directly from your paycheck. Most of the time, this is only possible after a court has entered a judgment. Here's how Nebraska regulates wage garnishments.

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Wage Garnishment in Missouri

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated November 1, 2021

A wage garnishment order allows creditors to take money directly from your paycheck. Most of the time, this is only possible after a court has entered a judgment. Here's how Missouri regulates wage garnishments.

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Wage Garnishment in Massachusetts

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated October 21, 2021

A wage garnishment order allows creditors to take money directly from your paycheck. Most of the time, this is only possible after a court has entered a judgment. Here's how Massachusetts regulates wage garnishments.

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Wage Garnishment In Maryland

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated October 21, 2021

A wage garnishment order allows creditors to take money directly from your paycheck. Most of the time, this is only possible after a court has entered a judgment. Here's how Maryland regulates wage garnishments.

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Wage Garnishment in Illinois

Written by Attorney Paige Hooper
Updated October 21, 2021

A wage garnishment order allows creditors to take money directly from your paycheck. Most of the time, this is only possible after a court has entered a judgment. Here's how Illinois regulates wage garnishments.

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Upsolve is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that started in 2016. Our mission is to help low-income families who cannot afford lawyers file bankruptcy for free, using an online web app. Spun out of Harvard Law School, our team includes lawyers, engineers, and judges. We have world-class funders that include the U.S. government, former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, and leading foundations. It's one of the greatest civil rights injustices of our time that low-income families can’t access their basic rights when they can’t afford to pay for help. Combining direct services and advocacy, we’re fighting this injustice.

To learn more, read why we started Upsolve in 2016, our reviews from past users, and our press coverage from places like the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.