2020 Best Invention
Attorney Paige Hooper

Attorney Paige Hooper

Bankruptcy Attorney

Paige Hooper is a seasoned consumer bankruptcy attorney with 15 years of experience successfully representing debtors in Chapter 7, Chapter 11 and Chapter 13 cases. Paige began practicing bankruptcy law in 2006 and started her own solo, multi-state bankruptcy practice in 2012. Given her expertise in bankruptcy, Paige was selected in 2011 to create a comprehensive library of practice forms, procedural guides, intake packets, and detailed manuals used to train attorneys and paralegals in bankruptcy law. Paige is committed to using her education and experience to help others and to make a positive difference in the world. She has a Bachelor of Journalism degree from the University of Missouri and a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Mississippi. She is actively licensed to practice law in Mississippi and Tennessee. When she’s not practicing law, Paige enjoys writing, cooking, painting, and spending time with her son, Mickey.


All ArticlesCredit IssuesBankruptcy BasicsCarsConsumer RightsDebtsHousingStudent LoansTaxes

Articles written by Attorney Paige Hooper

Income-Driven Student Loan Repayment Plans: How To Get One

The federal government offers income-driven repayment plans for student loans to help make the payments more affordable. In traditional repayment plans, your monthly payment amount is based on paying the loan in full by a certain date. But in an income-driven plan, your monthly loan payments are based on your income and family size, which helps ensure you can afford your loan payment each month. This article covers how income-driven plans work. It includes an overview of the four different types of income-driven repayment plans, how to choose the right plan for you, and how to apply for the income-driven repayment program.

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Home Foreclosure: How Long Does It Take?

Foreclosure is the legal process mortgage lenders use to take ownership of a house if the borrower doesn’t make the mortgage payments. How long foreclosure takes depends on many factors, but mostly on your state’s laws. This article describes the basic steps in the foreclosure process and a general timeframe for each step. It also highlights some of the vast differences in foreclosure timelines from state to state and explains some of the factors that lead to those differences.

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If Trump Companies Can File for Bankruptcy, Why Can’t I?

Bankruptcy isn’t something to be ashamed of. It helps businesses and people — including the former leader of the free world — escape from debt and move forward. Former President Donald Trump has repeatedly used bankruptcy to help his businesses and himself get ahead. This article discusses Donald Trump’s bankruptcies and how they benefited his companies. It also addresses how personal bankruptcy compares to business bankruptcy and why both are necessary for a healthy economy.

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Can I Remove Late Payments From My Credit?

Late payments on your credit report can cause a dramatic drop in your credit score. This can in turn substantially increase how much you’ll pay for financing. If you find falsely reported late payments on your credit report, you have a right to dispute the incorrect information. In some cases, even if the reported information isn’t blatantly inaccurate, you may still be able to negotiate with the creditor to remove the late payment from your credit history. This article will cover how late payments affect your credit report, the difference between when they're reported correctly and incorrectly on your credit report, and what you can do to remove them.

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What Are Guaranteed Auto Loans and How Do They Work?

Guaranteed auto financing allows people to buy cars even if they don’t qualify for traditional car loans. Dealerships will look at your current income and employment to determine whether you qualify. You may need to meet minimum income requirements and offer a down payment. These auto loans typically have high interest rates and fees. Shop around and read the fine print carefully to be sure you get the best terms.

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What Are Mortgage Lenders and Mortgage Servicers?

Whether you’re thinking about buying a home, refinancing an existing mortgage, or planning your next big investment, it’s important to understand how lenders and servicers fit into the mortgage process. This article will explain the differences between mortgage lenders and servicers so you can better prepare for your homebuying journey.

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Actions To Take if You’re Sued by a Debt Collector

If you haven’t paid a debt, you can be sued by a debt collector. If the debt collector wins the lawsuit and gets a judgment against you, they can take more aggressive collection actions. To avoid this, you’ll need to answer the complaint, prepare a defense, and show up to the hearing prepared. It’s also good to get familiar with debt collection laws, so you’ll know if the debt collector has broken them.

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How Loss Mitigation Can Help You

If you’re behind on your mortgage payments and are in danger of losing your home, know that foreclosure is not inevitable. In many cases, mortgage companies work with struggling borrowers to find foreclosure alternatives through a process called loss mitigation. Some mortgage companies even have dedicated in-house loss mitigation programs. This article will discuss four common kinds of loss mitigation solutions and how they work.

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What Is a Foreclosure Mediation Program and How Does It Work?

Even if your lender begins foreclosure proceedings you may still be able to get your mortgage back on track with a foreclosure mediation program. These programs use neutral third parties to help lenders and homeowners resolve mortgage issues without foreclosure. Mediation programs are great resources, but they aren’t available everywhere.

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The Basics of Chapter 9 Bankruptcy

Chapter 9 bankruptcy offers relief for struggling municipalities by shielding them from their creditors and allowing them to reorganizing their debts. Municipalities are granted broad authority to reorganize these debts, especially those related to pensions and labor unions. Chapter 9 filings are rare but often have lasting effects on communities and states.

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I Can’t Afford an Attorney. Can a Pro Bono Lawyer Help Me?

Nonprofit legal agencies and some attorneys offer free or low-fee assistance under certain circumstances. Other attorneys offer guidance on a contingency basis. Free bankruptcy help can be found via the no-cost filing tool provided by Upsolve.

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Chapter 12 Bankruptcy: An Overview

Filing for Chapter 12 bankruptcy helps family farmers and family fishermen relieve their debt burdens, reorganize their finances, continue operating their businesses, and keep the equipment they need to do their jobs.

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What Are Mini Miranda Rights?

When a debt collector contacts you, they have to identify themselves as a collector and tell you they're trying to collect on a debt. This is sometimes called a "Mini Miranda” requirement. This requirement was created to prevent unfair questioning and practices in the debt collection process. These rights are updated occasionally to address new communication technologies.

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Know Your Rights in the Foreclosure Process

The foreclosure process can be long and complicated. There are different processes for different types of loans, but here’s a general look at what will happen if you default on your mortgage and your lender decides to foreclose.

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What Is Refinancing Student Loans?

The benefits of student loan refinancing are different for everyone. How much refinancing can help you will depend on your existing loans and your current financial situation. This article covers what student loan refinancing is and how it works. You’ll also learn how to determine whether refinancing is right for you and how to compare lenders to maximize your benefits.

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Mortgage Rights After The Death Of A Spouse

When your spouse dies, mortgage debt doesn’t just disappear. Learn what you can expect regarding your home and mortgage after your spouse has passed away, and find answers to many common questions, such as who inherits the house, what happens to the mortgage, what rights and protections you have, and what a reverse mortgage is and how it works.

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Strict Foreclosure in Connecticut: How the Process Works

Under Connecticut law, there are two types of foreclosures: strict foreclosure and foreclosure by sale. Both types are judicial proceedings that begin with your mortgage servicer filing a lawsuit against you and proving to the court that your loan is in default. Your lender can request either type of foreclosure.

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17 Tips To Defend Your Small Claims Case

What should you do if you get sued in small claims court? While the answer depends on the type of case, the worst thing you can do in any case is nothing. A judgment, or court order, against you opens the door for the plaintiff (the person or company who is suing you) to garnish your wages, seize your property, or take other actions against you. Though rules and procedures vary from state to state, these are some important tips for defending any small claims case.

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The Differences Between Judicial and Nonjudicial Foreclosures

A judicial sale is the result of a lawsuit and a court order, while a nonjudicial sale takes place completely outside of a courtroom. While both procedures end in the same result, they aren’t identical. This article covers how each of these kinds of foreclosure works, the differences between the two, and how to defend yourself against each type.

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How Debt Relief Works

If you're struggling to keep up with the minimum payments or paying everything you can and not making a dent in the balances that you owe, there are several debt relief options available to help you eliminate your debt and move forward with your life. Read this article to learn the different types of debt relief available and how they work, the benefits and risks associated with each option, and which debt relief solution(s), if any, may be a good fit for your situation.

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How to File Form 433-A

This six-page form provides the IRS with detailed information about your financial situation. This information helps the IRS verify whether you’re eligible for the relief you’re requesting and determine what you can afford to pay. This article will walk you through how to complete the most recent version of the form.

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How the Right of Redemption Can Help You

If you’re facing a foreclosure action on your home, you may be able to use your right of redemption to keep your house. In most cases, you have the right to stop the sale by paying off your mortgage debt before the sale takes place. In some states, even after the sale, you have the right to buy the house back within a set amount of time.

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Help Yourself: Self-Reporting to the Credit Bureaus

In many cases, self-reporting your account information and payment activity to the major credit bureaus is a smart way to bulk up your credit report and improve your credit score. Self-reporting payments, such as rent and utilities, benefits your credit by adding on-time payments that wouldn’t ordinarily appear on your credit report. In this article, you’ll learn what self-reporting is, how it works, what you can report, and how to decide whether self-reporting is a good option for you.

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How Long Does It Take To Build Credit With a Secured Credit Card?

Secured credit cards are an option for people who typically don’t qualify for traditional credit cards. A secured credit account allows you to establish a history of on-time payments so you can build or improve your credit report and increase your credit score. This article covers what makes a secured credit card different from an ordinary credit card, how to use a secured card to establish or build credit, and how to decide if opening a secured credit card account is a good option for you.

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Credit Hacks To Get Better Credit Scores: A Guide

There is no magical trick to transform your credit overnight. Earning a great credit score takes time, patience, and discipline, but there are several hacks you can use to make reaching your credit goals a little faster and easier. This article covers some of the helpful tips and expert tactics that can boost your credit score.

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The Best Credit Moves if You Have a 500 Credit Score

If your score is 500, you may not be able to get credit, or you may face extremely high interest rates and fees. Fortunately, the sooner you start taking steps to actively raise your score, the sooner your credit rating will improve. This article covers the factors that lead to a 500 credit score, how that score can affect your ability to get financing, and some steps you can take now to start increasing your score.

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Should I Get A Medical Credit Card?

A medical credit card is similar to a regular credit card, but they can only be used for certain covered medical expenses and are only accepted by certain healthcare providers. In many cases, there are better options available to pay for medical expenses. This article will explain the benefits and drawbacks of using a medical credit card, help you decide whether this type of card is a good choice for you, and explore other medical financing alternatives you may want to consider.

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Judgment Debtor Exam — When A Judgment Creditor Asks You Questions

When a person or company wins a lawsuit against you, the court enters an order called a judgment. The judgment states the amount of money you owe the other party, including interest and costs. A judgment debtor examination, or debtor's exam, is a chance for the creditor to gather the necessary information to pursue one or more collection methods. This article discusses what information is covered in a judgment debtor exam, how the creditor can use that information to collect the debt from you, and what rights and protections you have.

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Ways That Student Loans Can Affect Your Mortgage

Homeownership is a major life goal for many people. In recent years, though, economic challenges have prevented many people from pursuing this goal. Student loan debt is often cited as a reason why so many people are waiting longer than ever to buy a home.

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How Partial Payment Installment Agreements Work

Owing a lot of income tax debt often feels inescapable, and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) can seem intimidating. Fortunately, the IRS has many options available to taxpayers who can’t pay all their taxes right away and will usually work with you to find a solution. This article takes a closer look at how the partial payment option works, how it compares to other solutions, and whether it may be a good choice for your situation.

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Upsolve is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that started in 2016. Our mission is to help low-income families who cannot afford lawyers file bankruptcy for free, using an online web app. Spun out of Harvard Law School, our team includes lawyers, engineers, and judges. We have world-class funders that include the U.S. government, former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, and leading foundations. It's one of the greatest civil rights injustices of our time that low-income families can’t access their basic rights when they can’t afford to pay for help. Combining direct services and advocacy, we’re fighting this injustice.

To learn more, read why we started Upsolve in 2016, our reviews from past users, and our press coverage from places like the New York Times and Wall Street Journal.